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Do you have a life raft on your aircraft?

by Switlik on 15. Nov, 2017 in Life Rafts

Depending on your aircraft and its operation, you may be required to have a life raft(s) with rated capacity and buoyancy for all of your passengers.  The FAA now requires a life raft on-board for flights over 50 miles overwater operations for Parts 121, 125 and 135 aircraft and for Part 91.501 over 100 miles overwater. And when traveling internationally, different regulations like the ICAO or Canadian regulations may additionally require one. Even if not mandated, large bodies of water, like lakes are an unforgiving environment, with hypothermia being a constant threat. For all aircraft, including Part 91 General, a life raft is the best protection from the elements when going further than gliding distance from land.

Using your Life Raft

by Switlik on 14. Nov, 2017 in Life Rafts

Reprint from Latitutes & Attitudes
Captain Richard Switlik


What do I do if I need it? 

Now that you've installed your raft, how do you launch it when needed? Unfortunately, there is no method or sequence that is appropriate for all circumstances. Remember the lawyer’s saying, "Circumstances alter cases." The amount of time you have is the main thing to consider. Fire, the raft's location, how fast water is coming in, number and condition of crew, and wind and sea conditions all may alter your actions.

You should follow these basic steps, however, for virtually all situations:

A case where preparations were key to mariners’ safety

by Switlik on 13. Nov, 2017

Accidents at sea can and do happen. Being prepared for them can be a matter of life or death.

Small doesn't have to be less safe

by Switlik on 08. Nov, 2017 in Aviation

They’re called puddle jumpers and island hoppers, to name just a few. And while most of us have had an experience or two flying in small planes, because of their size some tend to think they aren’t as safe as larger aircraft.

How to respond to person overboard

by Switlik on 27. Oct, 2017 in Marine

Most of us don’t want to consider the unthinkable while out sailing or cruising on the open waters, but accidents do happen and being prepared for emergencies, such as a person overboard, is essential to mariner safety.

According to the U.S. Sailing organization, “man overboard” is the third most nautical hail after “Land Ho!” and “Thar She Blows,” but it is clearly the most life-threatening.

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